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Robin Thicke Admits Drug Abuse, Says He Didn’t Co-Write “Blurred Lines”

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Image courtesy ABC/Kelsey McNealRemember last year, when Robin Thicke and Marvin Gaye‘s family got involved in a legal dispute over whether or not Thicke’s “Blurred Lines” borrows from Gaye’s hit song, “Got to Give It Up?”  Both Thicke and co-writer Pharrell Williams gave testimony about it during depositions in Los Angeles federal court — testimony in which Thicke not only reveals he didn’t really co-write the song, but also admits to drug abuse.

According to the deposition, obtained by The Hollywood Reporter, Thicke admitted he wasn’t truthful when he claimed during various interviews that he and Pharrell co-write “Blurred Lines,” including an interview with GQ magazine in which he claimed he and Pharrell “literally wrote the song in about a half hour and recorded it. The whole thing was done in a couple hours — normally, those are the best ones. Him and I would go back and forth where I’d sing a line and he’d be like, ‘Hey, hey, hey!'”

The truth, according to Thicke’s deposition, is that he was drunk and high while Pharrell wrote “Blurred Lines.”  “To be honest, that’s the only part where — I was high on vicodin and alcohol when I showed up at the studio,” Thicke testified.  “So my recollection is when we made the song, I thought I wanted — I  — I wanted to be more involved than I actually was by the time, nine months later, it became a huge hit and I wanted credit. So I started kind of convincing myself that I was a little more part of it than I was and I — because I didn’t want him — I wanted some credit for this big hit. But the reality is, is that Pharrell had the beat and he wrote almost every single part of the song.”

At one point, Thicke revealed he “didn’t do a single interview last year without being high.”  He eventually told his estranged wife, Paula Patton: “I told my wife the truth. That’s why she left me,” said Thicke.

In his sworn testimony, Pharrell pretty much confirms Thicke’s account about not co-writing “Blurred Lines.”  “This is what happens every day in our industry,” said Williams. “You know, people are made to look like they have much more authorship in the situation than they actually do. So that’s where the embellishment comes in.”

On Monday, attorney Howard King, managing partner of King, Holmes, Paterno & Berlinerone, released the following statement on behalf of Robin: “Robin’s moment of personal vulnerability is being exploited in the hope of diverting attention from the obvious weakness of their legal claim.”

The trial over the Gaye estate’s plagiarism claims is currently scheduled to get underway February 10, 2015.


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